TWEET ME

4/9/09

Conficker wakes up, drops payload

Andrew Nusca: The Conficker worm is finally active, updating via peer-to-peer between infected computers and dropping a mystery payload on infected computers, Trend Micro said on Wednesday.

The Conficker worm is finally active, updating via peer-to-peer between infected computers and dropping a mystery payload on infected computers, Trend Micro said on Wednesday.

CNET’s Elinor Mills reports that researchers are analyzing the code of the software that is being dropped onto infected computers and suspect that it is a keystroke logger or some other program designed to steal data from the machine.

The software appeared to be a .sys component hiding behind a rootkit, which is software that is designed to hide the fact that a computer has been compromised, according to Trend Micro. The software is heavily encrypted, which makes code analysis difficult, the researchers said.

Just yesterday, Zero Day blogger Dancho Danchev noted that a Conficker copycat was already making its rounds.

According to a post on the TrendLabs Malware blog, the awakened worm tries to connect to MySpace.com, MSN.com, eBay.com, CNN.com and AOL.com as a way to test that the computer has Internet connectivity. It then deletes all traces of itself in the host machine, and is scheduled to shut down on May 3.

Mills reports:

Because infected computers are receiving the new component in a staggered manner rather than all at once there should be no disruption to the Web sites the computers visit, said Paul Ferguson, advanced threats researcher for Trend Micro.

“After May 3, it shuts down and won’t do any replication,” Perry said. However, infected computers could still be remotely controlled to do something else, he added.

The development was found when Trend Micro researchers noticed a new file in the Windows Temp folder and a large encrypted TCP response from a known Conficker P2P IP node hosted in Korea:

Two things can be summed up from the events that transpired:

1. As expected, the P2P communications of the Downad/Conficker botnet may have just been used to serve an update, and not via HTTP. The Conficker/Downad P2P communications is now running in full swing!
2. Conficker-Waledac connection? Possible, but we still have to dig deeper into this…

As for the second point, researchers said the worm tries to access a known Waledac domain and download another encrypted file, but they’re still trying to examine the connection.

More Conficker news on ZDNet:

* Dancho Danchev: Fake “Conficker Infection Alert” spam campaign circulating (new!)
* Dancho Danchev: Conficker worm’s copycat Neeris spreading over IM
* Adrian Kingsley-Hughes: Friday Rant - Conficker worm hype
* Ryan Naraine: Eyeballing Conficker with eye-charts and maps
* Tom Espiner: Conficker an April Fool’s joke? Maybe not

Andrew NuscaAndrew J. Nusca is an assistant editor for ZDNet.com. See his full profile and disclosure of his industry affiliations.

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